Dale’s Wheels Through Time Museum is celebrating 17 years of preserving and promoting American motorcycle history from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. from July 4 to 8 in Maggie Valley.

During the weekend, the museum staff will be running  17 of the rarest bikes in the world as well as sharing stories from the past 115 years of American transportation history. Admission is $7 for Children 6-14 and $15 for Adults. Seniors and military veterans are $12. 

The running of 17 of the world’s rarest motorcycles will highlight the weekend celebration. Included in those 17 rarest motorcycles will be the 1916 Traub, the "world's rarest motorcycle," discovered bricked up behind a wall in Chicago, Illinois; a 1917 Henderson four-cylinder, once ridden by Maldwin Jones in an attempt to set a 24 hour speed record in Ohio, as well as an experimental 1941 Harley Davidson Shaft-Driven Knucklehead Servi-Car, one of only 17 built for the U.S. military.

Unlike any other transportation museum, Dale's Wheels Through Time has been nicknamed "The Museum That Runs," meaning that every complete motorcycle, automobile, or machine in the collection will fire up and run. The motto isn't just an advertising gimmick, as museum staff regularly start up to 20 different bikes for visitors each day they are open.

After 17 years, the collection continues to grow as the museum staff continues to track down rare and historic machines and memorabilia to add to the collection, and works to keep all the machines in operating condition. 

The vision for the museum started over 52 years ago when a young 15-year-old Walksler bought a wrecked Harley Davidson for $20 from behind a local service station and after a few weeks later, he had the bike running. 

Today, the museum is home to one of the world’s best collections of vintage American motorcycle and transportation history. For more information, visit www.wheelsthroughtime.com or call 926-6266.

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